Pre-Storm/Storm Contingency Plan

Having a documented Storm Emergency and Contingency Plan will help reduce the extent of damage and better prepare the staff for evacuation or safe congregation within a building. It also considers the implementation of the plan based upon past experience and the realistic expectation that sufficient time and staff will be available to implement the plan.

Meteorological information now gives us some advanced warning of impending storms so contingency plans can be triggered in good time.

Negative Positive
 
Tropical Storm
  • No written plan has been prepared.
  • A written plan that requires more time than would be provided by weather service storm warnings. An example would be a plan that requires 3 days to install manual shutter.
Tropical Storm
  • A well developed, written plan that has been successfully implemented during past storms.
Winter Storm
  • No written plan has been prepared.
Winter Storm
  • A written plan that has been enhanced through past high wind experience, and is periodically reviewed/rehearsed.

  • Develop and implement a written, comprehensive storm emergency action plan. The plan should outline actions to take before the cyclone/typhoon/hurricane season begins; when a cyclone/typhoon/hurricane watch is issued; when a storm warning is declared; during and after a storm. The plan should include an outline of dedicated emergency supplies to be maintained on site throughout the cyclone/typhoon/hurricane season.
  • Practice the storm emergency action plan. Verify that the actions to be taken before a cyclone/typhoon/hurricane can be completed within one or two days. Often, a cyclone alert or a hurricane watch is issued 36 to 48 hours before landfall, and a warning is issued 24 hours before landfall.
  • Expand the Storm Emergency & Contingency plan to include checking the anchoring points of fixed external equipment, the safe temporary removal of equipment likely to be damaged, and the securing or removal of loose items likely to be damaged or become projectiles in a storm.

Online Resources:

  • The World Meteorological Organization of the United Nations maintains a Severe Weather Information Center that includes a map showing any current global tropical cyclone activity with links to advisories and warnings.